Publicly traded assets

Assets that can be traded in a public market, such as the stock market. The New York Times Financial Glossary

Financial and business terms. 2012.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • publicly traded assets — assets that can be traded in a public market, such as the stock market. Bloomberg Financial Dictionary …   Financial and business terms

  • Level 1 Assets — Assets that have readily observable prices, and therefore a reliable fair market value. Level 1 assets include listed stocks, bonds, funds, or any assets that have a regular “mark to market” mechanism for pricing. Publicly traded… …   Investment dictionary

  • Level 2 Assets — Assets that do not have regular market pricing, but whose fair value can be readily determined based on other data values or market prices. Sometimes called “mark to model” assets, Level 2 asset values can be closely approximated… …   Investment dictionary

  • Level 3 Assets — Assets whose fair value cannot be determined by using observable measures, such as market prices or models. Level 3 assets are typically very illiquid, and fair values can only be calculated using estimates or risk adjusted value ranges. In… …   Investment dictionary

  • Exchange-traded fund — An exchange traded fund (ETF) is an investment fund traded on stock exchanges, much like stocks.[1] An ETF holds assets such as stocks, commodities, or bonds, and trades close to its net asset value over the course of the trading day. Most ETFs… …   Wikipedia

  • Top Holdings — The highest volume of publicly traded assets held by an individual, company or fund. These publicly traded assets may include company stock, mutual funds or other investment vehicles. Top holdings are typically determined by what percentage their …   Investment dictionary

  • Burton Malkiel — Burton Gordon Malkiel (born August 28, 1932) is an American economist and writer, most famous for his classic finance book A Random Walk Down Wall Street (now in its 9th edition, 2007). He is a leading proponent of the efficient market hypothesis …   Wikipedia

  • Price Efficiency — The premise that asset prices are efficient, to the extent that they already factor in or discount all available information. The theory of price efficiency follows from the efficient market hypothesis, which holds that since markets are… …   Investment dictionary

  • Economic Affairs — ▪ 2006 Introduction In 2005 rising U.S. deficits, tight monetary policies, and higher oil prices triggered by hurricane damage in the Gulf of Mexico were moderating influences on the world economy and on U.S. stock markets, but some other… …   Universalium

  • Business valuation — is a process and a set of procedures used to estimate the economic value of an owner’s interest in a business. Valuation is used by financial market participants to determine the price they are willing to pay or receive to consummate a sale of a… …   Wikipedia

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